Paper on aluminum treatments on Cape Cod approved for publication

A peer-reviewed article covering a dozen treatments of Cape Cod, MA lakes for control of internal phosphorus loading has been approved for publication in Lake and Reservoir Management. The paper is likely to appear in the June issue, but will be available online before then. Entitled “Aluminum Treatments to Control Internal Phosphorus Loading in Lakes on Cape Cod, Massachusetts”, it is authored by Kenneth J. Wagner, Dominic Meringolo, David F. Mitchell, Elizabeth Moran and Spence Smith and details projects from 1995 through 2016 where lakes and the underlying sediment were treated with aluminum sulfate and sodium aluminate to bind up surficial phosphorus bound to iron. That iron-bound phosphorus can be released when oxygen levels are low, as is usually the case in stratified lakes in New England. This internal source of phosphorus is often enough to support algae blooms, and comes with a low ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus, which tends to favor cyanobacteria. Consequently, inactivation of iron-bound phosphorus has been found to eliminate cyanobacterial blooms and increase water clarity in kettlehole lakes on Cape Cod.

Kettlehole lakes have limited surface inflow and depend on precipitation and groundwater as water sources. While the watershed is still important to lake condition over many years, it is that long-term accumulation of available phosphorus in the bottom sediments that drives conditions within any year. The review of treatments over the past two decades suggests some variability in results, but a positive impact on water quality overall for years after treatment. Two lakes have now been treated twice, one after about a decade and the other after 20 years. Surface phosphorus concentrations were reduced by 61% on average, while bottom phosphorus decreased by 84%. Chlorophyll-a, a pigment indicative of algae abundance, declined on average by 81%. These decreases translated into an increase in water clarity of 136% (more than a doubling from an average of 1.9 to 4.4 m) and a decrease in oxygen demand in deep water of 61%. Greater water clarity and more oxygen in deeper water were good for fish and other aquatic organisms as well as benefiting people with regard to water supply and recreation.

Aluminum application in process at Cliff Pond, Brewster, MA

2 thoughts on “Paper on aluminum treatments on Cape Cod approved for publication”

  1. This looks like a great tool for in-lake issues. Are there any “rules of thumb” to help lake associations know whether this might be something they should investigate for their own lake problems?

    1. To get an idea of whether or not inactivation of P in surficial sediment might be a good idea for any given lake, a P loading analysis is needed. If P release from the sediment is >25% of the total, it is a logical candidate for control, since nearly all of that load is contributed during summer and may actually be the dominant P source in that season. If the internal load is >50% of the total, some form of in-lake control will be necessary to improve the lake, even with the best of watershed management.

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